So Masrai came to Bakhu

I haven’t talked much about Masrai on here, since it was just a fictional pantheon as far as I was concerned. I don’t mean that to say that just because it’s fictional, it doesn’t mean anything. I say that to clarify that Masrai, and the gods of Her pantheon, came from somewhere in my head, and are not, as far as I know, gods that might once have existed in this world. I don’t know everything, of course, and the astral being what it is, there’s every chance that alternate universes exist, and who knows what might have been, and what happens to gods that were long-forgotten. Maybe it’s because I’ve spent a bit more time with these gods and maybe it’s one of those ‘name it and it comes to life’ things that characters often get. Maybe it’s different because they’re gods. I don’t know.

That said, I’ve kept a shrine to Masrai and some of Her other gods for a while now, mostly to keep that energy flowing in as I work on those novels. I don’t know why, but something told me to build a shrine, that this was important to give these gods a physical space in my room. Still, in spite of that, I haven’t done much in the way of worship. I didn’t really know what ritual forms to use, since these gods departed Egypt during Mythic Time, and have spent the rest of their lives in the Libyan desert. (In this story, at any rate. I can’t say what they did here, if they ever existed here at all.) But I still kept a shrine for them.

I’d never really had much more than a faint impression from Masrai as I wrote Her myths down, like something deeper had touched my mind, but nothing in terms of speaking or seeing Her. Writing Her myths down was never important for the novel, either. It’s extra information. But I don’t often buy fancy red handmade books and begin writing myths down for gods. I haven’t even done that for Sobek. But there was something about Masrai that made me start this book, and commit to finishing it. I am sure She gave me all the words, and now all I need to do is finish it.

But Monday’s meditation signalled that things had gone up a notch, and that this pantheon needs more from me than I was giving them. Woo warning, for those who need it. This is a bunch of weird shit even I am surprised by, so.

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Askei Kataskei is out!

And apart from being an excellent zine, you should also go read it because I wrote a Thing and it is in this issue 4 realz. I think I mentioned ages ago that I’d written this Hekate short story for one of the Covenant of Hekate’s monthly creative projects. Well, once it was done, I had the option of submitting it to AK, and so I did, and it was accepted, and now it is in the zine for all you lovely people to read. ❤

There are actually two short stories from that project in this issue, mine and one by Sara Buastis, as well as a bunch of other great articles and hymns and other things. It is worth your time to read it if you are interested in Hekate and other related things and like reading fiction.

Go read it here and share it around if you like it plz and thank you. ❤

Also, I have been messing about with my Hekate shrine, and added a bull/cow skull. I’ll do a separate post for that, and maybe go over why it’s become a Hekate shrine at the expense of pretty much everything else. But in the meantime, go read AK, if you like, and enjoy. Otherwise, have a good day. ❤

Myth: Sobek Shedety, He Who Rises Like Ra

I’ve been contemplating Shedety myths, and this idea of Sobek rising out of the lake like Ra, of being renewed in the waters before rising at dawn. I find it to be very beautiful imagery, and I’ve been thinking about it mostly because I started writing this other story, set in an alternate universe, where Egypt has been invaded and all the temples and priests are being destroyed. The one that’s left is one of Sobek’s, and His priests decide to escape, refusing to let their gods die with them.

And so along with that comes the development of what Sobek Shedety’s cult and worship would look like. What the rituals would look like. What other gods would be with Him. What stories would shape the way they see the world. And this idea of Sobek as Ra resonated, and it’s been sitting with me ever since.

And so I come to this myth. I’ve been working on what I will refer to as a Book of Shadows, for lack of a better conceptual description for it, and I wanted to include not just the Celestial Twins myth, but also one for Shedet, because even in three years, that’s how far my cosmology has shifted, so. This is what I ended up writing. I’ve only made minor edits in the process of typing it up; otherwise, it’s as it was originally written.

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